Departments

The region of Languedoc-Roussillon is one of the 26 regions of France. It comprises five departments, and borders the other French regions of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Rhône-Alpes, Auvergne, Midi-Pyrénées on the one side, and Spain, Andorra and the Mediterranean sea on the other side.

Comprising of the two former provinces of France (provinces were abolished after the French Revloution in 1790) of Languedoc whose capital was Toulouse, now in Midi-Pyrénées. Occassionally referred to as Occitania, the area where the Langue d'Oc (golden tongue or language) was spoken, and Roussillon corresponding roughly to the present-day southern Pyrénées-Orientales department sometimes referred to as Catalonia by the Catalan-speaking community.

Languedoc-Roussillon is a diverse region from the cool, empty highlands of Lozère to the hot and exotic Catalan region of the Pyrenees-Orientals. From snow-capped mountains to fabulous beaches, from wild un-spoilt countryside to busseling metropolises, this region has everything.

The diverse terrain and history of Languedoc Roussillon's 5 departments (Aude, Gard, Hérault, Lozère and Pyrénées-Orientales) has forged 5 diverse cultures and economies.

The five departments and their main towns are :

Aude

1. Aude

- perhaps the region's most gentle department, hosts the magnificent Canal du Midi (featured properties near Canal du Midi) as well as La Cité at Carcassonne





gard

2. Gard

- has a more Provençal feel with the Rhône river on its eastern border, the Cévennes mountains to the north, and the marshlands of the Camargue to the south.



Hérault

3. Hérault

- Languedoc's most populous department, is also its fastest growing, with thousands moving to Montpellier (Languedoc's capital) every month.


Lozère

4. Lozère

- the least populated French department covering four mountain ranges with numerous rivers, above and below ground, including the Tarn which flows through the Gorges du Tarn.

  • Mende


Pyrénées-Orientales

5. Pyrénées-Orientales

- the region is home both to the hilltop castles of the Cathar period and to the Mediterranean beaches that run along to the border with Spain. Read more about Pyrénées-Orientales . . .